Abbye learned to speak Croatian at a young age with her step-grandfather who took a boat across the sea to come to the United States when he was fourteen years old. Her sense of family and missing the old times with her grandfather prompted her to write her first book about a Croatian motorcycle club in the US.

Sunday, April 13, 2014

#AtoZChallenge Q&A #SerialKillers

There aren't a ton of questions, but I thought I'd share some previous questions and comments here. If you have any questions, you can also feel free to leave a comment with them and I'll see if I can get them answered in another upcoming Q&A post.

I figured this might be a fun way since many people never go back to view comment responses.



From Just-Cassie: What draws you to killers?
I probably should have gone into some sort of criminal psychology or something. For ages I've wished I could sit down with serial killers and hear their stories and reasoning from their own lips. And then draw my own conclusion. While I don't agree with murder (obviously) - crime and murder will (unfortunately) always exist. I always want to know more. Why would someone want to harm someone? Why would they want to kill them? How do they live with themselves after killing someone? How do they justify what they've done? I gave in and wrote a serial killer series (fiction - based on no specific killer) thinking that would snuff out my curiosity. It was going to be one book. One became two, two became three and so on. The criminal mind is a bundle of something I'd like to figure out.

From Alex: I really need to know how his murders earned him the "chessboard" nickname! Scary!
Alexander Pichushkin was nicknamed "The chessboard killer" was also called the Bitsa Park Maniac. Younger, he was often bullied. His grandfather had suggested a move and focusing on things other than school. He tried chess and enjoyed it - actually became very, very good at it, often beating people that had played for 40+ years. He found a way to vent some of his anger while dominating and controlling the chessboard for his wins.

From Charlotte: can you really do it for every letter???
I believe so. I think there may be two or three that will be difficult (or impossible). It's also a reason I use either the first or last name initial as the way I list for the day. Anyway, in that case, I'm going to try to fit in some fact or information or something Serial Killer related to cover that day. Some days I could have listed 10+ killers for the letter.




If you have questions that you'd like to see answered before this month is over, leave a blog comment on one of the serial killer posts (or even this one) or email me directly at Abbye.Kovacevic@gmail.com

Next Q&A set for April 27.









2 comments:

  1. Great idea to answer the questions like this - I know I run out of time to revisit each day's posts.
    Marlene at On Writing and Riding

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  2. You answer to the first question is similar to why I like reading about serial killers. Why they do what they do is a mystery because there are so many people who had similar childhoods yet didn't turn into murderous monsters. I like to read about them to see if I can figure out the answer.

    ~Patricia Lynne~
    Story Dam
    Patricia Lynne, YA Author

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